Lecture & Book Launch, June 14th: Have the Mountains Fallen? Two Journeys of Loss and Redemption in the Cold War

Date: 14 June 2018
Due to unforseen personal circumstances, the Lecture and Book Launch by Jeff Lilley, scheduled for June 14th 2018 at 12:00 to 13:00 has been cancelled. We regret any inconvenience caused. A new date will be conveyed when available.

Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic

Abstract
Have the Mountains Fallen?: Two Journeys of Loss and Redemption in the Cold War (Indiana University Press, 2018) tells the story of the Kyrgyz writer, Chinghiz Aitmatov, and Radio Liberty broadcaster, Azamat Altay. The two men were on different sides of the Iron Curtain, yet both battled for freedom for their captive people in Central Asia – Aitmatov using his pen, Altay his voice. Along the way, they became united in their efforts to help the Kyrgyz people preserve their culture and language, with their life journeys culminating in the collapse of the Soviet Union, independence for Kyrgyzstan, and personal redemption.

Biography
After witnessing the collapse of the Soviet Union as a journalist in the 1990s, Jeff Lilley moved to Central Asia in 2004. During a three-year posting in Kyrgyzstan, he started reading the works of Chinghiz Aitmatov, slept in yurts, drank fermented mare’s milk and hiked in the country’s beautiful mountains. Over the next ten years, as he worked in the field of democracy and governance support in Washington, DC and the Middle East, he continued research and finished writing the book. In 2016 he returned to Kyrgyzstan to lead a British-funded parliamentary support program. Lilley is the co-author of China Hands: Nine Decades of Adventure, Espionage and Diplomacy (Public Affairs, 2004).

Location 
University of Central Asia
138 Toktogul Street
Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
2nd Floor Seminar Room

Language
This event will be held in English.

Registration
You are kindly requested to confirm your participation. Please email Alma Uzbekova at alma.uzbekova@ucentralasia.org.

* Ideas presented in this lecture reflect the personal opinion of the speaker and do not necessarily represent the views of the University of Central Asia and/or its employees.
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