UCA Public Lecture, Khorog: The Psychology of Happiness and Well-being

Date: 02 May 2019
Other languages: Русский язык |
May 2nd 2019, 5.00 - 6.00 pm
Khorog, Tajikistan

Robin Higgins, M.A.
University Counsellor, Khorog Campus
University of Central Asia

Abstract
Happiness can seem elusive and fleeting, but psychologists and researchers have been discovering that many aspects of our mood and our sense of overall well-being are within our control. Happiness is often a result of our choices, habits, beliefs and social connections.

This lecture will explore recent research from the fields of sociology and neuro-science that helps us understand the misconceptions we have about our life satisfaction and some of the steps we can take both as individuals and as communities to increase an overall sense of well-being. Through a review of recent research, panel discussion and personal reflections, we will examine the roots for living a meaningful, healthy and happy life and we will consider what campuses, communities and countries can do to promote well-being as part of their core mandate.

Biography
Robin Higgins is a University Counsellor at the University of Central Asia, based at UCA’s Khorog campus. Prior to joining UCA, Higgins worked with as a Youth Mental Health clinician and spent 12 years at Canada’s Selkirk College where she provided personal and career counselling.  She served as Selkirk’s Trauma Assistance Team coordinator and Status of Women Committee’s Union Representative. Higgins was also part of the design team for her provincial Healthy Minds/Healthy Campus project.

Location
Ismaili Centre, Khorog
132 Shotemur Street
Social Hall
Khorog, Tajikistan

Language­­­
The lecture will be delivered in English, with consecutive Tajik translation provided.

Registration
Please confirm your participation by sending an e-mail to Makhfirat Olimshoeva, Faculty Coordinator: makhfirat.olimshoeva@ucentralasia.org.

Ideas presented in this lecture reflect the personal opinion of the speaker and do not necessarily represent the views of the University of Central Asia and/or its employees.
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